COVID-19 information

Coronavirus – advice and information

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)

Coronavirus particle

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2).

Coronavirus around the world, also known as:

  • 2019-nCoV acute respiratory disease;
  • Novel coronavirus pneumonia;
  • Wuhan pneumonia;
  • Wuhan coronavirus;
  • Misspelled like corona virus, corona-virus, corono virus, coronovirus or coronavairus.

Coronavirus Disease Symptoms

COVID-19 symptoms

The COVID19 virus affects different people in different ways. COVID-19 is a respiratory disease and most infected people will develop mild to moderate coronavirus disease symptoms and recover without requiring special treatment. People who have underlying medical conditions and those over 60 years old have a higher risk of developing severe disease and death.

Common coronavirus disease symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure (based on the incubation period of MERS-CoV viruses) and include:

Protective measures against COVID-19

Flattening the curve

To prevent infection and to slow transmission of the new coronavirus (COVID-19), do the following:

  • Wash your hands regularly with soap and water, or clean them with alcohol-based hand rub;
  • Maintain at least 2 meter distance between you and other people;
  • Avoid touching your face;
  • Cover your mouth and nose with your bent elbow or tissue when coughing or sneezing;
  • Stay home if you feel unwell;
  • Practice physical distancing by avoiding unnecessary travel and staying away from large groups of people.

The Fight for PPE Persists

Protective masks

Frontline health workers report a frustrating return to shortages of protective gear.

The White House’s suggestion? Reuse their face masks and personal protective equipment, reports Fox News, citing Vice President Mike Pence’s comments yesterday.

National Nurses United expressed alarm over the persistent shortages and message to reuse their gear. "We’re five months into this and there are still shortages of gowns, hair covers, shoe covers, masks, N95 masks," says its president, Deborah Burger.

Scientists Press WHO on Airborne Transmission

N95 mask

Evidence is mounting that tiny, infectious COVID-19 droplets linger in the air longer than once thought, according to a group of scientists urging the WHO to update its guidance, The Washington Post reports.

200+ scientists from 30 countries collaborated on an open letter—set to be published in the journal Clinical Infectious Disease—directed at the agency, which has maintained that SARS-CoV-2 is spread primarily by large respiratory droplets that quickly sink to the floor.

Reopening Followed By Resurgence

reopening

Lockdowns are winding down even as coronavirus cases continue to rise in at least 20 US states, NPR reports. And the US has now reached 2 million confirmed cases—a chilling milestone.

But the uptick is uneven. While some early hot-spots like New York are seeing a sustained decline in cases, hospitalizations are rising in others.

Texas—among the first states to begin reopening—saw record hospitalizations this week. And Arizona, which has the highest per capita rate in the US, has drawn national attention. The state is averaging 1,000+ cases per day this week.

How the pandemic has affected primary healthcare around the world

pandemic

The new coronavirus has affected people’s health in more ways than one. In this Special Feature, we look at what the pandemic has meant for primary healthcare access in countries around the world.

Over the past few weeks, Medical News Today have investigated the many ways in which the coronavirus pandemic has affected — directly or indirectly — the lives of people all around the globe.

In one feature, we spoke about how restrictive measures put in place to curb the spread of the virus have taken a toll on people’s daily lives and their mental health.

How Apple and Google will let your phone warn you if you’ve been exposed to the coronavirus

Coffee shop

On April 10, Apple and Google announced a coronavirus exposure notification system that will be built into their smartphone operating systems, iOS and Android. The system uses the ubiquitous Bluetooth short-range wireless communication technology.

There are dozens of apps being developed around the world that alert people if they’ve been exposed to a person who has tested positive for COVID-19. Many of them also report the identities of the exposed people to public health authorities, which has raised privacy concerns. Several other exposure notification projects, including PACT, BlueTrace and the Covid Watch project, take a similar privacy-protecting approach to Apple’s and Google’s initiative.

Why are necropsies not performed in the Covid-19 pandemic?

Prof. Dr. V. Astarastoae

The COVID-19 medical crisis we are going through has brought us into situations we have never encountered before, from the phenomenon of social distancing to the lack of any articulated solution plan. Prof. Dr. Vasile Astarastoae made several analyzes in the last weeks of the medical oddities from COVID-19 crisis. Today it raises a new question: why are necropsies not performed on the bodies of those who died because of SARS-CoV-2 virus. This is all the more strange as it is the first time that this medical research tool is not used.

The COVID-19 crisis is certainly a phenomenon that humanity has never encountered. Isolating people in homes, but also the lack of a solution plan, other than driving with masks on their faces and the possibility of being stuck at any time, make this medical problem even more complicated.

Coronavirus drifts through the air in microscopic droplets – here’s the science of infectious aerosols

Pflugge droplets

During the 1970s when I was growing up in Southern California, the air was so polluted that I was regularly sent home from high school to “shelter in place.” There might not seem to be much in common between staying home due to air pollution and staying home to fight the coronavirus pandemic, but fundamentally, both have a lot to do with aerosols.

Aerosols are the tiny floating pieces of pollution that make up Los Angeles’ famous smog, the dust particles you see floating in a ray of sunshine and also the small droplets of liquid that escape your mouth when you talk, cough or breathe. These small pieces of floating liquids can contain pieces of the coronavirus and can be major contributor to its spread.

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