COVID-19 treatment

Can coronavirus be cured?

New drug candidate against the novel coronavirus

COVID-19 treatment

A team of scientists from China has found a new candidate drug against the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, which works by inhibiting a key part of the virus’s machinery.

Much of the world is on hold until scientists find a vaccine for the novel coronavirus, which has, so far, claimed hundreds of thousands of lives.

However, with current estimates suggesting that a vaccine is 12–18 months away, many people are placing increasing hope on an effective treatment for COVID-19.

A Setback for Remdesivir—and Sunlight

Remdesivir vial

Hopes for a promising COVID-19 treatment suffered a setback yesterday after WHO inadvertently published a summary of a remdesivir clinical trial on its website, STAT reports.

The summary, which has since been removed, showed the drug "failed to speed the improvement of patients with Covid-19 or prevent them from dying," according to STAT.

A french study finds that nicotine protects from COVID-19 disease

Nicotine patch

Does Nicotine Protect Against Covid? This is the very serious hypothesis of a Pitié-Salpêtrière team and a world renowned neurobiologist. It should soon be the subject of a clinical study: nicotinic patches will be administered to patients and caregivers to measure the effects.

Nicotine, a preventive and curative remedy against Covid, is therefore the hypothesis defended by an internal medicine team from the Pitié Salpétrière hospital, and a world-renowned neurobiologist, member of the Academy of Sciences, Jean-Pierre Changeux.

Hydroxychloroquine is not such a good idea

Hydroxychloroquine as treatment for COVID-19

Humans have trouble grasping an essential fact about COVID-19: Nothing will be easy.

Once hailed as a wonder treatment, the antimalarial hydroxychloroquine is starting to look like not such a good idea.

New but not yet peer-reviewed research among 368 patients found the drug didn’t help patients and more patients who received it died than those who had standard care, AP reports.

Could an antiparasitic drug kill off SARS-CoV-2 within 2 days?

COVID 19 researchers

A new study in cell cultures suggests that ivermectin, an existing antiparasitic drug, is able to eliminate SARS-CoV-2 within 48 hours. However, whether this approach is safe and effective in human beings remains to be seen.

As the race toward an efficient treatment for coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) continues, researchers are experimenting with new and old drugs alike.

A study paper recently published in the journal Antiviral Research indicates that investigators from the Victorian Infectious Diseases Reference Laboratory (VIDRL) and Monash University, both in Melbourne, Australia, may have found a viable treatment: an existing antiparasitic drug called ivermectin.

Remdesivir: 'Very potent inhibitor' of SARS-CoV-2?

microscope

Experimental Ebola drug remdesivir could stop SARS-CoV-2 from replicating by acting on a key enzyme, according to a new study from the University of Alberta.

Last month, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced the launch of a multinational trial, testing the four most promising therapeutic avenues for COVID-19.

One of these avenues is remdesivir, a drug that research scientists initially developed for the treatment of Ebola, but which has recently shown some promise in fighting coronaviruses.

U.S. companies that are working on coronavirus treatments or vaccines

Covid-19 research

A mix of legacy drug makers and small startups have stepped forward with plans to develop vaccines or treatments that target the infection caused by the novel coronavirus.

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which was first detected in December in Wuhan, China, has sickened more than 1,150,000 people worldwide and killed at least 64,500. There are no approved vaccines or therapies for the disease although the use of hydroxychloroquine sulfate and chloroquine phosphate to treat COVID-19 patients is authorised.

A small trial finds that hydroxychloroquine is not effective for treating coronavirus

Hydroxychloroquine 200 mg

On Saturday the Food and Drug Administration approved the use of two antimalarial drugs, hydroxychloroquine and a related medication, chloroquine, for emergency use to treat COVID-19. The drugs were touted by President Trump as a “game changer” for COVID-19.

However, a study just published in a French medical journal provides new evidence that hydroxychloroquine does not appear to help the immune system clear the coronavirus from the body. The study comes on the heels of two others - one in France and one in China - that reported some benefits in the combination of hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin for COVID-19 patients who didn’t have severe symptoms of the virus.

The Desperate Global Search for Treatments

Workers check on chloroquine phosphate

Habeeb Ahmad went through 2 failed courses of drugs for his COVID-19 infection. And then his family failed to get a third drug, remdesivir, theWashington Post reports.

The 41-year-old ophthalmologist and father of 3 remains intubated and unconscious in an ICU in Long Island, New York.

The desperate search for Ahmad reflects the global efforts to find treatments against COVID-19.

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