COVID-19 vaccine

Coronavirus vaccination

Treatment of Coronavirus disease 2019

rRT-PCR test kit for COVID-19

Treatment of Coronavirus disease 2019 is mainly supportive care, which may include fluid, oxygen support, and supporting other affected vital organs. The WHO and CDC recommend that those who suspect they carry the virus wear a simple face mask. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been used to address the issue of respiratory failure, but its benefits are still under consideration.

Some medical professionals recommend paracetamol (acetaminophen) over ibuprofen for first-line use. The WHO does not oppose the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen for symptoms; currently there is no evidence that NSAIDs worsen COVID-19 symptoms. Steroids such as methylprednisolone are not recommended unless the disease is complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome.

Coronavirus research

SARS-CoV-2

Vaccine

There is no available vaccine, but coronavirus research into developing a vaccine has been undertaken by various agencies. There are three vaccination strategies being investigated:

  • First, researchers aim to build a whole virus vaccine. The use of such a virus (inactive or dead) aims to elicit a prompt immune response of the human body to a new infection with COVID-19.
  • A second strategy, subunit vaccines, aims to create a vaccine that sensitises the immune system to certain subunits of the virus. In the case of SARS-CoV-2, such research focuses on the S-spike protein that helps the virus intrude the ACE2 enzyme receptor.
  • A third strategy is that of the nucleic acid vaccines (DNA or RNA vaccines, a novel technique for creating a vaccination).

2 Vaccines: So Far, So Good

Oxford coronavirus vaccine trial

It’s still early days for 2 coronavirus vaccine candidates, but trial results published yesterday in The Lancet earned promising (though qualified) results.

The first vaccine, developed by Oxford University and AstraZeneca and sporting the catchy name of ChAdOx1 nCoV-19, safely generated strong immune responses in a trial involving 1,000+ patients, according to a Lancet article reported on by The Washington Post.

Larger phase 3 trials of the vaccine are already underway in the UK, Brazil, and South Africa with results expected sometime this fall, STAT reports.

Human Challenge Trial Controversy Heats up

Covid-19 vaccine human challenge trials

The WHO will issue ethical guidelines to inform human challenge trials, South China Morning Post reports, amid aggressive efforts to find a COVID-19 vaccine.

Deliberately infecting healthy human volunteers with a virus to test vaccine candidates can speed the vaccine timeline—but it’s a dangerous tack for a disease with no cure.

With COVID-19, however, proponents argue that the risk of serious illness or death is small in likely recruits—young adults.

The mysterious disappearance of the first SARS virus, and why we need a vaccine for the current one but didn’t for the other

anti-SARS outfits

Some people question why the current coronavirus has brought the world to standstill while a previous deadly coronavirus, SARS, did not.

Others have questioned why a vaccine is so urgently needed now to stop the spread of the current coronavirus when a vaccine was never developed for SARS.

I study viruses and am so fascinated by their complexity that I have written a book about them. The tale of SARS and its new cousin that causes COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, shows just how unpredictable viruses can be, particularly when they jump from animals to humans. Understanding emerging, infectious diseases needs to be a priority. SARS, which killed about one in 10 infected people, turned out to be highly lethal but ultimately, and somewhat mysteriously, disappeared.

A majority of vaccine skeptics plan to refuse a COVID-19 vaccine, a study suggests, and that could be a big problem

Dr. Anthony Fauci

The availability of a vaccine for the novel coronavirus will likely play a key role in determining when Americans can return to life as usual. Dr. Anthony Fauci, head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, on April 30 announced that a vaccine could even be available by January 2021.

Whether a vaccine can end this pandemic successfully, however, depends on more than its effectiveness at providing immunity against the virus, or how quickly it can be produced in mass quantities. Americans also must choose to receive the vaccine.

Anti-Vaxxers Already Undermining Potential Coronavirus Vaccines

Vaccine research

For many, a COVID-19 vaccine can’t come soon enough, but vaccine opponents are already undermining "confidence in what could be humanity’s best chance to defeat the virus," the AP reports.

They’re spreading misinformation:

  • Vaccine trials will be rushed
  • Anthony Fauci is in cahoots with vaccine makers seeking to profit off the tragedy
  • Bill Gates wants to use a vaccine to inject people with microchips or curb the population.

Vaccine Hesitancy Post-COVID-19: Will Our Memory Fade or Last?

A child receiving a vaccine

Full-scale efforts are underway to develop a vaccine free us from COVID-19’s deadly grip. But even if they succeed (and that’s no guarantee), the question regrettably must be asked: Will people take it?

Given the severity of the current crisis, taking countless lives and sending our socioeconomic systems to the brink of collapse, it seems unimaginable that anyone would reject a Coronavirus vaccine. Yet, over the last 2 decades, vaccine hesitancy has risen so substantially that the WHO now considers it a major threat to global health.

COVID-19 vaccine may be ready by fall and other reasons for hope

covid-19-vaccine

About a month ago, Medical News Today started a series aiming to bring together the more encouraging research that emerges around COVID-19. We continue with this Special Feature that focuses on an incoming vaccine and other potential treatments for this new coronavirus and the disease it causes.

With this series, we aim to remind our readers that while COVID-19 causes great sorrow and loss around the world, the resulting global emergency has also meant that scientists are working at an unprecedented pace. They are making progress that is easy to overlook among the worrying numbers of new cases and deaths.

U.S. companies that are working on coronavirus treatments or vaccines

Covid-19 research

A mix of legacy drug makers and small startups have stepped forward with plans to develop vaccines or treatments that target the infection caused by the novel coronavirus.

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which was first detected in December in Wuhan, China, has sickened more than 1,150,000 people worldwide and killed at least 64,500. There are no approved vaccines or therapies for the disease although the use of hydroxychloroquine sulfate and chloroquine phosphate to treat COVID-19 patients is authorised.

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