SARS-CoV-2

SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2)

Could an antiparasitic drug kill off SARS-CoV-2 within 2 days?

COVID 19 researchers

A new study in cell cultures suggests that ivermectin, an existing antiparasitic drug, is able to eliminate SARS-CoV-2 within 48 hours. However, whether this approach is safe and effective in human beings remains to be seen.

As the race toward an efficient treatment for coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) continues, researchers are experimenting with new and old drugs alike.

A study paper recently published in the journal Antiviral Research indicates that investigators from the Victorian Infectious Diseases Reference Laboratory (VIDRL) and Monash University, both in Melbourne, Australia, may have found a viable treatment: an existing antiparasitic drug called ivermectin.

Serology-based tests for COVID-19

COVID-19 tests

Serology testing for SARS-CoV-2 is at increased demand in order to better quantify the number of cases of COVID-19, including those that may be asymptomatic or have recovered. Serology tests are blood-based tests that can be used to identify whether people have been exposed to a particular pathogen by looking at their immune response. In contrast, the RT-PCR tests currently being used globally to diagnose cases of COVID-19 can only indicate the presence of viral material during infection and will not indicate if a person was infected and subsequently recovered. These tests can give greater detail into the prevalence of a disease in a population by identifying individuals who have developed antibodies to the virus.

COVID-19: What happens inside the body?

x-ray

How does the body respond when the SARS-CoV-2 virus infects it? Which physiological processes help or hinder us in getting rid of the virus, and which processes ensure that we have a mild form of COVID-19, the disease that the virus causes? In this Special Feature, we investigate.

The more we learn about COVID-19, the more we have to question our assumptions about it.

Early on in the COVID-19 pandemic, our information about the disease came from clinical case reports of COVID-19 and what we knew about influenza pandemics and the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) resulting from SARS-CoV.

COVID-19 vaccine may be ready by fall and other reasons for hope

covid-19-vaccine

About a month ago, Medical News Today started a series aiming to bring together the more encouraging research that emerges around COVID-19. We continue with this Special Feature that focuses on an incoming vaccine and other potential treatments for this new coronavirus and the disease it causes.

With this series, we aim to remind our readers that while COVID-19 causes great sorrow and loss around the world, the resulting global emergency has also meant that scientists are working at an unprecedented pace. They are making progress that is easy to overlook among the worrying numbers of new cases and deaths.

Common coronaviruses appear to be highly seasonal

snowing

A recent study concludes that the four most common human coronaviruses follow distinct seasonal patterns.

A recent study by the University of Michigan School of Public Health in Ann Arbor tracked a group of participants over 8 years. The team looked in detail at the prevalence of the four most common human coronaviruses in the population.

The research, which now appears in The Journal of Infectious Diseases, shines a light on an understudied aspect of coronaviruses and may prove valuable for scientists trying to make sense of the current pandemic.

 

New study pinpoints loss of smell and taste as COVID-19 symptoms

SARS-CoV-2 virus

A new study looking at the data of people who tested positive for COVID-19 backs up recent claims that the loss of the senses of smell and taste can be a symptom of the disease.

New research from the UC San Diego Health provides evidence that the loss of smell and taste can be a symptom of COVID-19.

Earlier this month, preliminary findings in a preprint started making headlines because they suggested that the list of possible COVID-19 symptoms should include the loss of smell and taste.

Remdesivir: 'Very potent inhibitor' of SARS-CoV-2?

microscope

Experimental Ebola drug remdesivir could stop SARS-CoV-2 from replicating by acting on a key enzyme, according to a new study from the University of Alberta.

Last month, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced the launch of a multinational trial, testing the four most promising therapeutic avenues for COVID-19.

One of these avenues is remdesivir, a drug that research scientists initially developed for the treatment of Ebola, but which has recently shown some promise in fighting coronaviruses.

Sex differences in COVID-19

Sex differences in COVID-19

COVID-19 affects people differently, in terms of infection with the virus SARS-CoV-2 and mortality rates. In this Special Feature, we focus on some of the sex differences that characterize this pandemic.

There are many ways in which the pandemic itself affects people’s day-to-day lives, and gender — understood as the ensemble of social expectations, norms, and roles we associate with being a man, woman, trans- or nonbinary person — plays a massive part.

On a societal level, COVID-19 has affected cis- and transwomen, for example, differently to how it has cismen, transmen, and nonbinary people. Reproductive rights, decision making around the pandemic, and domestic violence are just some key areas where the pandemic has negatively impacted women.

New study questions the effectiveness of masks against SARS-CoV-2

masks

Research published at the beginning of April casts serious doubts about the effectiveness of both surgical and cloth masks in preventing the spread of infectious SARS-CoV-2 particles.

In an effort to find more ways of slowing the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers and public health officials around the world have been debating whether using face masks in public might help.

This is a long and fraught debate, and international specialists and decision makers have not reached a consensus.

COVID-19 treatment: New findings may bring researchers a step closer

Coronavirus

A new study from Cornell University has made a discovery about SARS-CoV-2 that may help researchers develop an appropriate treatment.

Five researchers from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, set out to learn more about the structure and mechanisms related to two coronaviruses that have created turmoil in the past. These are SARS-CoV, the virus that can lead to severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), and MERS-CoV, which can trigger Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS).

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